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Terhune Art Gallery

(567) 661-7081


In Our Own Right

Antonio Adams, Charles Holtz, Charlotte McGraw, Wallace Peck and Cardon Smith

February 2 – March 3, 2018
Artists’ Reception: Thursday, March 1, 5-7 p.m.

Free and open to the public.

Curated by Susan Dlouhy and Patty Mitchell of The Creative Abundance Group along with River House Arts, In Our Own Right presents the bold vision and expressive genius of five self-taught Ohio artists.

The model of The Creative Abundance Group can best be described as a context that surrounds the way services are provided with and for people experiencing developmental differences.


Contact Us & Hours

For additional information, contact the Terhune Gallery at (567) 661-7081.

Hours
Monday and Wednesday, 2-6 p.m.
Tuesday and Thursday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Or by appointment

The Gallery also may be opened by appointment. Call (567) 661-7081 to arrange a time.

Owens Community College and the Department of Fine and Performing Arts promotes freedom of expression without restriction on content or form. The views expressed in the works exhibited in the Walter E. Terhune Gallery are those of the exhibitors and may not be those of the Department or the College.

Proposal Guidelines

View the Art Gallery Proposal Guidelines (pdf).


About the Walter E. Terhune Gallery

The 1,300-square foot Gallery is part of the Center for Fine and Performing Arts. It is committed to exhibiting diverse, vibrant visual arts created by faculty, students and community members, and to embedding arts programming within the curriculum. Exhibits at the Gallery -- both in the main exhibit space and along the outside wall -- have spanned a wide range of media and styles, from traditional art to interactive, multi-media installations.

The Gallery is named on behalf of the Walter E. Terhune, following a donation in 2003 to the Owens Community College Foundation from KeyBank's Terhune Memorial Fund. Established in 1926, the Walter E. Terhune Memorial Fund was created by Mr. Terhune's daughter, Alice Crosby Terhune, to honor her father who was a longtime Toledo businessman and philanthropist. Mr. Terhune was an owner and officer of Clark and Terhune Lumber Merchants, a successful lumber company in the 1800s.